Foregrounding a form of psychic arcao Logy ‘autopsy of a myth’ challenges the conventions of paraaestetics /seeking thru time to stage these encounters /a vertiginous mirror or a source of information medicine.
Mark Stewart

There’s no such thing as you
Peter Harris

BombArt is a collaboration between artists Mark Stewart and Peter Harris.

Mark Stewart is an artist, vocalist, producer and songwriter from Bristol. As a founding member of The Pop Group, Mark Stewart & The Maffia, and as a soloist, Stewart has remained an anarchic and pioneering figure since the punk era, a constant source of discordance amongst the frontiers of post-punk, dub, industrial and electronic music.

In a body of work driven by an explosive form of lyricism and inspired by radical politics, protest movements, theory, philosophy, technology, art and poetry, Stewart has fearlessly cultivated a revelatory collision of ideas, ideals and influences throughout an indisputably ground-breaking and seditious career.

Across Stewart’s career his extra-musical projects and collaborations have been shaped by dissent and provocation, from the scandal that surrounded his ‘Hitler’s Secret Daughter’ show at Kunstforum in Vienna to his collaboration with Kenneth Anger at the Serralves Foundation in Porto. Continuing his work in these territories and following in the footsteps of Charles Bukowski, Stewart was artist-in-residence at Western Front, Vancouver and is co-founder of The New Banalists with the artist Rupert Goldsworthy, a collective that has explored montage, mass media, the viral image and capitalism. Stewart has also formed a musical wing of the collective, collaborating with members of Crass, Killing Joke and Current 93 on the ‘Mammon’ EP.

In a closely related collaboration Stewart and Goldsworthy worked together on ‘I Am The Law’, an exhibition at the Ritter / Zamet gallery in London, hailed by Dazed Magazine as a place where ‘found objects, wall paintings and scrawled writings come together in a ritualistic pile-on of references. An effort to explore cultural myths, symbols, signs and ‘radical brands’ – the power of representation, charged with dystopian views, prison gates and rioting crowds.’

Other notable collaborations have included a site-specific live performance with Russell Haswell and the Mika Vainio at Donaufestival, as well as myriad audio and visual collaborations with the likes of KK Null, Asia Argento and Bestial Mouths.

In some of his more recent work Stewart has collaborated with the artist Alan Dunn, contributing to MA/68, a sound collage premiered at Liverpool’s Time Tunnel Festival, the Four Words: Future project, a series that was part of Dunn’s takeover of the Channel 4 streaming service, and Indie-Vision, a commission that exhibited billboards for a month throughout Peterborough featuring questions posed by artists. For this Stewart reframed the title of The Pop Group’s second album ‘For How Much Longer Do We Tolerate Mass Murder?’

Stewart has also contributed a graphic text based piece with a reflection on the legacy of the Peterloo massacre to the People’s History Museum 2019 exhibition ‘From Peterloo To Where’ alongside contributions from the likes of film director Mike Leigh and the artist James ‘Jimmy’ Cauty (The KLF)
In the same year Stewart performed alongside Gareth Sager and sound artist Matthew Shaw for ‘Blood Money’, an incendiary site specific live installation at High Cross House for Sea Change Festival. Stewart has more in the works in the form of ‘Pictures & Words’, an upcoming limited-edition art zine book with frequent collaborator Rupert Goldsworthy.

Alongside these projects Stewart has worked on archival material for The Pop Group and for Mark Stewart & The Maffia as part of an extensive program of reissues and new releases.

The influential cultural theorist and writer Mark Fisher (‘Capitalist Realism’) has appraised Stewart’s work as representing a connection ‘between dub’s dismantling of the song, William Burroughs’ cut-up techniques, and Situationist detournement’ whilst the author and environmentalist Rob Hopkins (‘From What is to What If’: Unleashing the power of imagination to create the future we want’) has described Stewart as ‘one of the great artists of my time, challenging, not for the faint-hearted, ahead of his time’ whose ‘larger-than-life prophetic voice changed me, and my sense of what’s possible, forever’.

Moving, mind-mangling, amazing…sounds that still beckon from an unrealized future’ whilst The Wire have called the album ‘the perfect alchemical marriage of wayward genius… the ultimate statement of radical visionary consciousness’.
Dangerous Minds

www.markstewartmusic.com
www.facebook.com/markstewartmusic
www.thepopgroup.net

Peter Harris is an artist, film-maker and musician. His work often involves experimenting with new ways of making self-portraits, many of which become collaborations.  In 1998 he began working ‘by proxy’, inviting family and cultural icons who have had an influence on his life to give him ideas for paintings, searching for his identity through those who had played a part in constructing it. This current project with Mark Stewart continues this idea, exploring a more in-depth collaboration through an ongoing series.

His longest running and most well-known association is with Jamaican music legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry. Since 2003 they have been working on a series of drawings, paintings and films as well as music projects.

In 2003 he collaborated with the London Mennonite Society to make the short film Hymn which was screened at the National Film Theatre. His feature length cult documentary Higher Powers (2004) features interviews with a host of eclectic personalities including the future Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Ken Russell, Uri Geller, a gangster, police chief, religious leader as well as artists interspersed with performance art pieces and animations.

In 2018 he began working with Trashmouth Records and released his first solo album Adverts which included guest performances by Lee Perry and Vic Godard. Each album contained an ‘art advert’ in the form of a one-off painted collage.

He is currently working with Zsa Zsa Sapien from the South London band Meatraffle on a collaborative music project under the name ‘The Hi Fi Twins’.

‘One of the most original, thought-provoking and unsettling artists of his generation’.
Simon Groom, Director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

‘The London art world does not deserve him’.
John Slyce, Flash Art

‘England’s number one painter’.
Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry

‘The Art Don’
Adrian Sherwood

www.peterharrisart.co.uk
www.leescratchperry-peterharris-art.com
www.facebook.com/PeterHarrisMusicArt

About

Foregrounding a form of psychic arcao Logy ‘autopsy of a myth’ challenges the conventions of paraaestetics /seeking thru time to stage these encounters /a vertiginous mirror or a source of information medicine.
Mark Stewart

There’s no such thing as you
Peter Harris

BombArt is a collaboration between artists Mark Stewart and Peter Harris.

Mark Stewart is an artist, vocalist, producer and songwriter from Bristol. As a founding member of The Pop Group, Mark Stewart & The Maffia, and as a soloist, Stewart has remained an anarchic and pioneering figure since the punk era, a constant source of discordance amongst the frontiers of post-punk, dub, industrial and electronic music.

In a body of work driven by an explosive form of lyricism and inspired by radical politics, protest movements, theory, philosophy, technology, art and poetry, Stewart has fearlessly cultivated a revelatory collision of ideas, ideals and influences throughout an indisputably ground-breaking and seditious career.

Across Stewart’s career his extra-musical projects and collaborations have been shaped by dissent and provocation, from the scandal that surrounded his ‘Hitler’s Secret Daughter’ show at Kunstforum in Vienna to his collaboration with Kenneth Anger at the Serralves Foundation in Porto. Continuing his work in these territories and following in the footsteps of Charles Bukowski, Stewart was artist-in-residence at Western Front, Vancouver and is co-founder of The New Banalists with the artist Rupert Goldsworthy, a collective that has explored montage, mass media, the viral image and capitalism. Stewart has also formed a musical wing of the collective, collaborating with members of Crass, Killing Joke and Current 93 on the ‘Mammon’ EP.

In a closely related collaboration Stewart and Goldsworthy worked together on ‘I Am The Law’, an exhibition at the Ritter / Zamet gallery in London, hailed by Dazed Magazine as a place where ‘found objects, wall paintings and scrawled writings come together in a ritualistic pile-on of references. An effort to explore cultural myths, symbols, signs and ‘radical brands’ – the power of representation, charged with dystopian views, prison gates and rioting crowds.’

Other notable collaborations have included a site-specific live performance with Russell Haswell and the Mika Vainio at Donaufestival, as well as myriad audio and visual collaborations with the likes of KK Null, Asia Argento and Bestial Mouths.

In some of his more recent work Stewart has collaborated with the artist Alan Dunn, contributing to MA/68, a sound collage premiered at Liverpool’s Time Tunnel Festival, the Four Words: Future project, a series that was part of Dunn’s takeover of the Channel 4 streaming service, and Indie-Vision, a commission that exhibited billboards for a month throughout Peterborough featuring questions posed by artists. For this Stewart reframed the title of The Pop Group’s second album ‘For How Much Longer Do We Tolerate Mass Murder?’

Stewart has also contributed a graphic text based piece with a reflection on the legacy of the Peterloo massacre to the People’s History Museum 2019 exhibition ‘From Peterloo To Where’ alongside contributions from the likes of film director Mike Leigh and the artist James ‘Jimmy’ Cauty (The KLF)
In the same year Stewart performed alongside Gareth Sager and sound artist Matthew Shaw for ‘Blood Money’, an incendiary site specific live installation at High Cross House for Sea Change Festival. Stewart has more in the works in the form of ‘Pictures & Words’, an upcoming limited-edition art zine book with frequent collaborator Rupert Goldsworthy.

Alongside these projects Stewart has worked on archival material for The Pop Group and for Mark Stewart & The Maffia as part of an extensive program of reissues and new releases.

The influential cultural theorist and writer Mark Fisher (‘Capitalist Realism’) has appraised Stewart’s work as representing a connection ‘between dub’s dismantling of the song, William Burroughs’ cut-up techniques, and Situationist detournement’ whilst the author and environmentalist Rob Hopkins (‘From What is to What If’: Unleashing the power of imagination to create the future we want’) has described Stewart as ‘one of the great artists of my time, challenging, not for the faint-hearted, ahead of his time’ whose ‘larger-than-life prophetic voice changed me, and my sense of what’s possible, forever’.

Moving, mind-mangling, amazing…sounds that still beckon from an unrealized future’ whilst The Wire have called the album ‘the perfect alchemical marriage of wayward genius… the ultimate statement of radical visionary consciousness’.
Dangerous Minds

www.markstewartmusic.com
www.facebook.com/markstewartmusic
www.thepopgroup.net

Peter Harris is an artist, film-maker and musician. His work often involves experimenting with new ways of making self-portraits, many of which become collaborations.  In 1998 he began working ‘by proxy’, inviting family and cultural icons who have had an influence on his life to give him ideas for paintings, searching for his identity through those who had played a part in constructing it. This current project with Mark Stewart continues this idea, exploring a more in-depth collaboration through an ongoing series.

His longest running and most well-known association is with Jamaican music legend Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry. Since 2003 they have been working on a series of drawings, paintings and films as well as music projects.

In 2003 he collaborated with the London Mennonite Society to make the short film Hymn which was screened at the National Film Theatre. His feature length cult documentary Higher Powers (2004) features interviews with a host of eclectic personalities including the future Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Ken Russell, Uri Geller, a gangster, police chief, religious leader as well as artists interspersed with performance art pieces and animations.

In 2018 he began working with Trashmouth Records and released his first solo album Adverts which included guest performances by Lee Perry and Vic Godard. Each album contained an ‘art advert’ in the form of a one-off painted collage.

He is currently working with Zsa Zsa Sapien from the South London band Meatraffle on a collaborative music project under the name ‘The Hi Fi Twins’.

‘One of the most original, thought-provoking and unsettling artists of his generation’.
Simon Groom, Director of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

‘The London art world does not deserve him’.
John Slyce, Flash Art

‘England’s number one painter’.
Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry

‘The Art Don’
Adrian Sherwood

www.peterharrisart.co.uk
www.leescratchperry-peterharris-art.com
www.facebook.com/PeterHarrisMusicArt